17 September 1860: Men of the Irish Battalion of St. Patrick of the Papal army fought a Piedmontese army OTD

Catalpa

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17 September 1860: Men of the Irish Battalion of St. Patrick of the Papal army fought a Piedmontese army under the command of General Brignone at Spoleto, Italy on this day. Spoleto is a walled city south of Florence with the fortress of Rocca on the side of a hill. Three companies of the Battalion of St. Patrick (312 soldiers & 15 officers) under the Battalion Commander, Major Myles O'Reilly (County Louth) were stationed there. Major O'Reilly commanded 645 men in total at Spoleto including 150 Italians, 160 Swiss, and 24 Franco-Belgians.

In spite of a long and heavy bombardment, the advancing Piedmontese troops were met with a withering fire by the Irish on the walls that stopped them in their tracks. However the bishop of Spoleto, distraught at the destruction and the loss of life, arranged a cease-fire. O'Reilly was nearly out of ammunition at that anyway. A Papal representative was sent to General Brignone and surrender terms were arranged. Brignone described O'Reilly as "both honourable and brave" and allowed the Irish to march out as prisoners with officers retaining their swords.

'Given the task of protecting the North Wall and the vital Gate House of the majestic Castle Albornozian, the Irish performed with distinction, holding their ground and the gate for 14 hours despite heavy hand-to-hand fighting and under constant bombardment from General Brigonne's field artillery. After withstanding repeated attacks, Major O'Reilly eventually negotiated a favorable surrender when reinforcements had become unlikely.'


For their service, each officer and enlisted man was awarded a commemorative service medal—Medaglia di Pro Petri Sede'Medal for the seat of Saint Peter' [above] and all those who fought were declared ‘meritorious of the Catholic Church, the Holy See and all human society’.
 

Clanrickard

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Nothing honourable about Irish soldiers defending land stolen by the papacy.
Conan Obrien Ugh GIF by Team Coco
 

The Field Marshal

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Misplaced gallantry by our own.
These British soldiers [Myles Oreilly was a British militia officer] were simply pawns used by the papacy to retain control of the extensive Papal States.

A weapon utilised by the popes in this fight was the strict condemnation of all forms of nationalism.

One wonders if these Irish soldiers would have fought for Irish independence .
Tenant evictions were occurring on a large scale at the time and

  • 25 February 1861 – £11,000 collected at church doors in Dublin to finance the Pope's defence against the Risorgimento in Italy; £80,000 collected nationwide (the equivalent of several millions of modern-day Euros).[1]
 

Esatdigiwank

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These British soldiers [Myles Oreilly was a British militia officer] were simply pawns used by the papacy to retain control of the extensive Papal States.

A weapon utilised by the popes in this fight was the strict condemnation of all forms of nationalism.

One wonders if these Irish soldiers would have fought for Irish independence .
Tenant evictions were occurring on a large scale at the time and

  • 25 February 1861 – £11,000 collected at church doors in Dublin to finance the Pope's defence against the Risorgimento in Italy; £80,000 collected nationwide (the equivalent of several millions of modern-day Euros).[1]
Christ on a pogo stick, we only just had a famine-genocide and our own mercenaries gallivant to the Papal cause. Easy to manipulate Paddy .
 

The Field Marshal

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Christ on a pogo stick, we only just had a famine-genocide and our own mercenaries gallivant to the Papal cause. Easy to manipulate Paddy .
Yes.
The British militia officer Myles OReilly led an expedition army of 900 presumably Irish catholics to help the pope in his fight to hold onto the Papal States
He subsequently was one of the founders of the Home Rule league.

One can understand the Ulster Unionists complaint that Home Rule was Rome Rule.

 

Eriugena

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O'Reilly and The Battalion of St. Patrick are to be praised for defending the Church and Her rights against the forces of Freemasonry led by Garibaldi.
 

Esto Praesidium

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8Christ on a pogo stick, we only just had a famine-genocide and our own mercenaries gallivant to the Papal cause. Easy to manipulate Paddy .
Irish-born soldiers serving in 1854 constituted some 30–35 per cent of the army, and it is estimated that by the end of the war, around 30,000 Irish soldiers had served in the Crimea. ... In total, 28 men of Irish birth were awarded the Victoria Cross during the Crimean War.


Attitudes to the war in Ireland

What was the impact of this European war on Ireland? One could well imagine that Ireland, just a few years after the Famine and the failed Young Ireland rebellion of 1848, would regard the war with a sense of sullen disinterest. Newspaper accounts of the period, however, suggest the contrary. In the early months of 1854 Ireland was gripped by a kind of war fever as regiments departed and young men rushed to join up to fight in a war which, it was assumed, would be over in a few months. Indeed, in scenes that mirrored later events in 1914, public enthusiasm bordered on hysteria as the troops left for the east.
 

Catalpa

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Yes.
The British militia officer Myles OReilly led an expedition army of 900 presumably Irish catholics to help the pope in his fight to hold onto the Papal States
He subsequently was one of the founders of the Home Rule league.

One can understand the Ulster Unionists complaint that Home Rule was Rome Rule.


The 1st three leaders of the Home Rule movement were all Protestants

Chairmen (leaders) of the Party, 1873–1882[edit]​

 

The Field Marshal

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The 1st three leaders of the Home Rule movement were all Protestants

Chairmen (leaders) of the Party, 1873–1882[edit]​

well Myles OReilly , one of the home rule founders and catholic British soldier was prepraed to kill to defend the papal states and got 900 irish catholics to help him,

if you were an ulster prod would you think that represented a seperation of church and state?
 

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